Study guide

This is the general part of the Faculty of Education study guide. See the course degree structures page for more information on the individual degrees. Information on specific courses you'll find in Weboodi.

Contents

1. Faculty of Education

     1.1 Programmes offered by the Faculty of Education

     1.2 Teacher Training School

     1.3 Administrative bodies

     1.4 Contact information

2. Study rights

     2.1 Right to pursue studies

     2.2 Extent of the right to study

     2.3 Duration of the right to study

     2.4 Minor subject studies in the Faculty of Education

     2.5 Non-degree studies

     2.6 Studies to supplement a degree

3. Degrees and programmes

     3.1 Degree programmes in the Faculty of Education

     3.2 Scope and structure of the Master’s and Bachelor’s degrees

     3.3 Learning outcomes for the Bachelor’s degree

     3.4 Completing the Bachelor’s degree

     3.5 Learning outcomes for the Master’s degree

     3.6 Completing the Master’s degree

     3.7 Doctoral education in the Faculty of Education

4. Studying

     4.1 Personal study plan (PSP)

     4.2 Teaching periods

     4.3 Participation in teaching

     4.4 Language and communication studies

     4.5 Practice periods

     4.6 Free-choice studies

     4.7 Examinations

     4.8 Publication of exam results

     4.9 Faculty of Education ethical instructions

     4.10 Accreditation of studies

     4.11 Staff members in charge of the programmes

     4.12 Expiry of studies

     4.13 Certificates

     4.14 Student associations in the Faculty of Education

     4.15 Teachers’ qualification requirements

     4.16 University of Oulu Education Regulations

5. Assessment of studies

     5.1 Bachelor’s and Master’s theses

     5.2 Publication of Bachelor’s and Master’s theses

     5.3 Abstract of Bachelor’s and Master’s theses

     5.4 Maturity test and its assessment

     5.5 Assessment of Bachelor’s theses

     5.6 Examination of Master’s theses

     5.7 Assessment criteria for the Master’s thesis

     5.8 Assessment of other studies

6. Student counselling

     6.1 Counselling at the University of Oulu

     6.2 Student counselling in the Faculty of Education

     6.3 Small group tutoring

 

 

1. Faculty of Education

1.1 Programmes offered by the Faculty of Education

The Faculty of Education at the University of Oulu is a scientific community doing research on growth, education and training, educating teachers and other specialists in the field of education.

The Faculty’s main function is to carry out research on the theoretical and ethical foundations of education and on learning and teaching, and based on this, to educate on a comprehensive and flexible basis specialists in the field of education, especially teachers.

The depth and width of the training is enabled by collaboration with other faculties and units in the university and with educational institutions, companies and other stakeholders representing different fields.

The disciplines covered by the Faculty are education, educational psychology, music education, special education, psychology and sociology.

Teacher education can be focused on primary, secondary, adult or early and preprimary education, depending on the programme and the student’s own choices.

Primary teacher education also offers an opportunity to choose a creative arts or technology oriented programme. The Faculty is also implementing an expert training programme called Intercultural Teacher Education in which the students are trained for international tasks in education, an early childhood education programme qualifying its students as kindergarten teachers, and a special education programme for qualification as a special education teacher.

The University of Oulu is one of three Finnish universities providing education for music teachers. The education in Oulu focuses on training music teachers for general primary and secondary schools.

The Educational Sciences Programme is based on the scientific basis of education and educational psychology, providing abilities for scientific research and educational expert tasks in various kinds of organizations.

The Faculty also has expertise in educational technology, women’s and gender studies and multiculturalism, and provides teaching related to these areas.

Students from the various subject departments of the university, aiming to qualify as teachers of their own subjects, come to the Faculty to pursue their pedagogical studies for teachers.

1.2 Teacher Training School

The Oulu University Teacher Training School offers a development and research field for all the faculties and departments of the university. In addition to teacher training, the training school implements a variety of activities for school development and research. The school is an open learning environment, with each learner observing a variable individual curriculum.

The Teacher Training School has units at Linnanmaa and Koskela.

1.3 Administrative bodies

The governing bodies of the Faculty are the Faculty Board, the Education Committee and the Degree Programme Committees. As of November 2017, the Faculty Board is chaired by the Dean, Eila Estola, while the Education Committee is chaired by the Education Dean, Sari Harmoinen.

1.4 Contact information

Faculty of Education
PO Box 2000, 90014 UNIVERSITY OF OULU
Visiting address: Yliopistokatu 9,
Snellmania, Linnanmaa.
Tel. +358 294 480000 (exchange)
Fax +358 8 553 3600
Inquiries: study.education@oulu.fi 


Oulu Teacher Training School, Grades 0-6, Linnanmaa

Yliopistokatu 48,
PO Box 9200, 90014 UNIVERSITY OF OULU
Tel. +358 294 480000 (exchange)
Fax + 358 8 553 3752
Oulu Teacher Training School, Grades 7-9 and Upper Secondary School, 
Kaitoväylä 7,
PO Box 9300, 90014 UNIVERSITY OF OULU
Tel. +358 294 480000 (exchange)
Fax +358 8 553 3775

 

Oulu Teacher Training School, Grades 0-6

Koskela School

Tullimiehentie 8, 90560 OULU

Tel. +358 44 7039250 (principal)
+358 44 7039251 (office)

All the staff e-mail addresses in the University of Oulu are as follows: firstname.lastname@oulu.fi.

For contact information of the Faculty of Education staff, see www.oulu.fi/ktk/node/45064

2. Study rights

2.1 Right to pursue studies

In the primary sense, the right to pursue studies refers to a right to pursue studies for a degree.

The right to pursue non-degree (“separate”) studies means a right to pursue studies that do not count towards a degree, a right to participate in a certain set of lessons and a right to gain credits for individual courses.

When a right is granted at the same time to pursue studies for both a lower and higher university degree, or just for a higher degree, the granting of rights to all the students to pursue the studies shall be based on confirmed admission criteria.

The right to pursue studies (including a new right to a student who is already pursuing studies and a right obtained through admission by transfer) is obtained through the annual student admission procedure. The grounds for student admission can be found at www.oulu.fi/edu/admissions.

An exception is formed by students changing their major subject within a field of education, in the case of whom the following principles are followed:

By the Faculty’s consent, a student who has been admitted to pursue studies in the Faculty can, while s/he is still actively studying, change his or her major subject, if there are free student places available in the target subject. This change can take place during the second year of study at the earliest.

Whenever applicable, this procedure shall follow the grounds on which the students were admitted to study in each programme. A transfer to a teacher education programme can only take place through the student admission procedure.

Academic eligibility based on education received abroad

Any applicants who have received their academic eligibility based on education abroad will be admitted through the joint application procedure based on an entrance examination.

Applicants and scholarship holders within a foreign cultural exchange scheme can be admitted by a special decision.

2.2 Extent of the right to study

Students who have acquired the right to pursue studies through the universities’ joint application system can only enrol for a single faculty and a single degree programme or major for each term.

If a student wishes to acquire a right to pursue studies for a degree in another faculty or degree programme as well, s/he needs to take part in the student admission procedure of the faculty in question after his/her first year of enrolment.

In the case of students who have come to the Faculty through cultural or student exchange programmes or holding a scholarship or equivalent, the right to pursue studies can be granted for a limited period.

2.3 Duration of the right to study

There are provisions in the Universities Act on the duration of a university student’s right to study. A student shall enrol in the university annually to use his/her right to pursue studies.

There are also specific regulations on the expiry of credits.

2.4 Minor subject studies in the Faculty of Education

Students of other faculties at the University of Oulu enrolled for attendance have, in principle, a right to pursue basic and intermediate studies in the subjects offered by the Faculty of Education. Due to the limited teaching and staff resources, however, an application must be submitted to the Faculty’s Education Dean for a right to pursue these studies. When students are selected, priority is given to students of the Faculties of Humanities and Science who are in a degree programme or specialization with goals that best match the study module that their application applies to. The annual deadline for applications is August 15.

Students who have enrolled for attendance in other faculties of the University of Oulu have a free right to pursue minor subject studies in sociology and in women’s and gender studies.

For more on minor subject studies, see http://www.oulu.fi/edu/minor_subject_studies.

2.5 Non-degree studies

The right to pursue non-degree studies is only meant for students who do not currently have any right to pursue studies in a university. An application to pursue non-degree studies can be filed, for instance, by a graduate from another university or an applicant who has not pursued any academic studies. Meanwhile, graduates from the University of Oulu can apply for a right to pursue supplementary studies within two years of the expiry of their right to study. Later on, they can apply for a right to pursue non-degree studies. The annual deadline for applications is August 15.

2.6 Studies to supplement a degree

Upon completion of the Master’s degree, the graduate’s right to pursue studies in the Faculty of Education expires on July 31 at the end of the academic year in which he or she graduated. If the graduate wishes to supplement his or her degree to, for instance, continue with unfinished studies in a minor subject, or to start studying a new minor in the Faculty of Education, s/he needs to apply for a separate right to pursue studies. An application for the right to pursue supplementary studies shall be submitted within two years of graduation. The annual deadline for applications is August 15.

The right to pursue supplementary studies is granted for two academic years. Commencement of the studies cannot be postponed.

Application to pursue non-degree, supplementary and minor subject studies does not apply to the pedagogical studies for teachers, multidisciplinary studies in the subjects and cross-curricular themes taught in basic education, professional studies in early childhood education, professional studies in special education, and the studies in a subject taught in schools when they require individual teaching, as well as any study modules for which there is a specific application procedure.

For an application form for non-degree, supplementary and minor subject studies, see www.oulu.fi/edu/masters_and_other_special.

3. Degrees and programmes

3.1 Degrees and programmes in the Faculty of Education

According to the Decree on University Degrees (794/2004), the degrees in the field of education are as follows:

1. Bachelor of Arts in Education (lower university degree)

2. Master of Arts in Education (higher university degree)

3. Licentiate of Philosophy in Education (scientific postgraduate degree)

4. Doctor of Philosophy in Education (scientific postgraduate degree)

The Degree Programme in Teaching and Education at the Faculty of Education features the following specializations and major subjects leading to the degree of Master of Arts (Education):

• Specialization in Special Education, majoring in special education

• Specialization in Education, majoring in education or educational psychology

• Specialization in Primary Teacher Education (broadly based, technology oriented, creative arts oriented, and Intercultural Teacher Education), majoring in education

• Specialization in Music Education, majoring in music education

• Specialization in Early Childhood Education, majoring in education, especially early childhood education.

Students are admitted to the Faculty of Education to pursue studies for both a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree. If specifically mentioned, a student admission procedure can also refer to studies for a Master’s or postgraduate degree only.

A student cannot take the Master’s degree before s/he has completed his or her Bachelor’s degree.

A degree certificate is issued for both degrees. Studies included in the Bachelor’s degree cannot be included in the Master’s degree, nor can studies counted towards to the Master’s degree be included in a scientific postgraduate (i.e. doctor’s) degree.

The studies in the various subjects comprise basic, intermediate and advanced studies. The degrees also include compulsory language, communication and orientation studies.

Master’s programmes

There are two international Master’s programmes in the Faculty of Education: Master’s Programme in Education and Globalisation (EDGLO) and the Master’s Programme in Learning, Education and Technology (LET).

The studies consist of language and communication studies, advanced studies in education, a Master’s thesis, and studies in a minor subject.

The students are awarded a Master’s degree certificate that makes them eligible for postgraduate studies. The degree does not constitute any formal qualification as a teacher.

The Master’s Programme in Education and Globalisation

The degree consists of language and communication studies, advanced studies in educational sciences, Master’s thesis and minor subject studies.

Students are awarded an MA (Education) degree, which offers an opportunity to continue with doctoral studies. The degree does not, however, constitute a formal teaching qualification.

The Master’s Programme in Learning, Education and Technology (LET) educates experts in learning. The contents of the programme are based on central and recent research in the learning sciences and technology-enhanced learning. The core of the education consists of three theoretical viewpoints: self-regulated learning, collaborative learning, and the learning of expertise. In addition, the program includes the exploration of the significance of learning and educational technologies in the working life and the society both now and in the future.

The studies are completed in two academic years as both contact and online teaching. Teaching is organized as full-time study. After completing the programme, students are awarded a Master of Arts (Education) degree which enables them to continue their academic studies at doctoral level. The degree does not constitute a formal teaching qualification.

3.2 Scope and structure of the Master’s and Bachelor’s degrees

The extent of the studies required for the Bachelor’s degree is 180 ECTS credits. The programmes are organized in such a way that a student can complete the degree in three years of full-time study.

The extent of the studies required for the Master’s degree is 120 ECTS credits. The degree can be completed in two years of full-time study.

In these degrees, the studies in the various subjects and study modules comparable to subjects consist of the following:

• Basic studies with a scope of at least 25 credits;

• Intermediate studies with a scope, together with the basic studies, of at least 60 credits. The intermediate studies in the major subject or comparable study module of the degree, or of the degree programme, include a thesis of at least 6 and at most 10 credits;

• Advanced studies with a scope of at least 60 credits.

• The advanced studies in the major subject or comparable study module of the degree, or of the degree programme, include a thesis of at least 20 and at most 40 credits.

The studies are measured by credits. The courses are scored depending on the workload required by them. One credit corresponds to about 27 hours of work by the student. The workload of 1600 hours required on the average to complete one academic year’s studies is equivalent to 60 credits.

Each programme can also include optional, free-choice or extraordinary studies.

In optional studies, the student shall choose one of several alternatives.

The free-choice (elective) studies can be chosen by the student from his or her preferred area, including studies offered by other faculties and universities.

Extraordinary studies are not counted towards the total extent of a degree, as they are ‘extraordinary’ as indicated by their name. Extraordinary studies can be courses and study modules offered by the Faculty of Education or other faculties.

3.3 Learning outcomes for the Bachelor’s degree

Having completed the Bachelor’s degree, the student:

• is familiar with the basics of the major and minor subjects or comparable study modules of the degree or of the studies included in the degree programme. S/he possesses the prerequisites to follow developments in the field,
• is capable of scientific thinking and scientific working methods,
• is able to continue to study for a higher university degree and is capable of continuous learning,
• knows how to apply the knowledge s/he has acquired in working life, and
• is in possession of sufficient communication and language skills.

3.4 Completing the Bachelor’s degree

The Bachelor’s degree shall be completed before the Master’s degree. Any studies included in the Bachelor’s degree cannot be counted towards the Master’s degree.

To be awarded the degree, the student shall complete at least the basic and intermediate studies of the major subject or comparable study module or of the degree programme, including a Bachelor’s thesis and language and communication studies.

The student shall be able to show that s/he has achieved the goals set for the degree, studies and thesis, and completed the statutory studies in the second national language and in at least one foreign language.

The student shall also pass a maturity test showing familiarity with the field of the Bachelor’s thesis and skills in Finnish or Swedish. For more information, see 5.4.

3.5 Learning outcomes for the Master’s thesis

Having completed the Master’s thesis, the student:

• is well familiar with the basics of the major subject or comparable study module and the minor subjects
• knows how to apply scientific knowledge and scientific methods
• knows how to function in working life as an expert and developer in his or her own field
• is capable of taking part in scientific postgraduate education, and
• is in possession of good communication and language skills.

3.6 Completing the Master’s degree

The student pursues his or her studies in the order shown by the two-tier degree structure. If it is important for flexible progress of the studies to take a Master’s level course already in the Bachelor stage, it can be done if allowed by the available resources, providing that the antecedent studies required for completion of the course have been completed. In all the specialization programmes of the Faculty, the Bachelor’s degree shall be completed before the start of the Master’s thesis seminar.

To be awarded the Master’s degree, the student shall complete at least the advanced studies in the major subject or comparable study module, or the advanced studies of the degree programme, and the supervised practical training that may form part of the degree. The student shall also complete the required amount of minor subject studies.

The student shall be able to show that s/he has achieved the goals set for the degree, studies and thesis, and the language skills referred to in section 6 of the Decree on University Degrees (794/2004).

The student shall also pass a maturity test to show familiarity with the field of his/her thesis and skills in Finnish or Swedish. The student need not prove his or her skill in Finnish or Swedish in a maturity test for a higher university degree taken in the same language, if s/he has already shown his or her language skills in a maturity test passed for a lower university degree. The maturity test for a Master’s degree is substituted by the abstract of the Master’s thesis, if the student has already passed the maturity test in his or her Bachelor’s degree.

3.7 Doctoral education in the Faculty of Education

The university-wide graduate school (University of Oulu Graduate School, UniOGS) is meant for all students pursuing their doctoral studies in the University of Oulu. The main function of the graduate school is to promote high-level doctoral education in the University of Oulu, meaning among other things the establishment of uniform practices for doctoral education in the university (granting of rights to pursue doctoral studies, study requirements, study counselling and monitoring, practices related to doctoral theses).

For more information, see www.oulu.fi/uniogs/.

4. Studying

4.1 Personal study plan (PSP)

The personal study plan (PSP) is a plan constructed by the student for him/herself on the contents, extent and duration of the studies. The basis for a student’s PSP is provided by the structure of the degree programme. The plan helps the student to proceed in his or her studies and to stay on schedule. Every student in the Faculty of Education constructs a personal study plan at the start of his or her studies, and it will be updated in the course of the study path.

When the personal study plan is being constructed, it is also a good idea to record the student’s own expectations and goals connected with studies and skills to be achieved. By means of the PSP, the student can construct a personally oriented degree for him/herself by choosing minor subjects and optional studies that s/he is interested in, in addition to the compulsory studies.

It already makes good sense for the student at the early stages of the studies to become familiar with the study guide and think about the studies and their scheduling in the long run. In this way, the personal study plan works as an outline for time to spend on the studies and also clarifies the student’s goals.

The student shall take into account in his/her planning what kind of work – such as lectures, exercises, essays or examinations – is required by the studies in each course, and which preceding studies need to be completed. When planning the studies, the student should also consider other things, such as family, hobbies and work, which might have an impact on the progress of the studies.

PSP guidance

In issues related to the construction of the personal study plan, the student can get help from his or her teacher-tutor, small group tutor and study advisor.

The personal study plan is constructed with the help of the OodiHOPS tool. The student composes an overall picture of the contents and timing of the personal study plan based on the degree structures described in Oodi. OodiHOPS allows him/her to see the planned courses and completed courses, which makes it easier to monitor the fulfilment of the PSP for both the student and the tutor. Having constructed his or her PSP, the student will have a discussion on the plan with his or her teacher-tutor.

See here for the PSP instructions for students: www.oulu.fi/oodienglish/students.

4.2 Teaching periods

In the academic year 2017-2018, the studies are divided into four periods as follows:

1st period: September 4-October 27

2nd period: October 30-December 22

3rd period: January 8-March 9

4th period: March 12-May 11

There is a week of orientation before the beginning of the first period, and there may also be teaching after the last period in the spring, mainly examinations and last meetings of a few courses.

Teaching is mainly arranged from 8 am to 4 pm Mondays to Fridays, in stretches of two or four hours:

8.15-9.45

10.15-11.45

12.30-14.00

14.30-16.00

A course continues throughout a period, or may cover several periods. All the teaching, exercises, examinations and feedback for a course are contained within a period. General written examinations can be sat on the general examination days throughout the academic year.

Registration for all courses takes place on Weboodi.

4.3 Participation in teaching

The compulsory and optional courses included in each programme are presented on Weboodi. The various ways to pursue the studies are detailed in the curriculum for each programme. The student shall go along with the prevailing curriculum in his or her studies, irrespective of the year when he or she started to study.

The student shall always attend the first session of a course, during which the teacher gives details about the practical issues related to the course.

The main rule is that the courses should be taken in the order in which they are presented in the curriculum. At the start of a course, agreement is made on the principles and practical procedures (book exams, summaries, etc.) by which absences from practical teaching, and from compulsory attendance in the practice periods, can be compensated for, if caused by an illness or some other compelling reason. Whenever teaching requires compulsory attendance, the maximum presence that a student can be required is 90%, with the exception of teaching practice.

In certain courses, the maximum group size of about 20 students cannot really be exceeded. The number of students is limited by the size of the room, safety issues, and the amount of available tools and materials. The Faculty has agreed on joint principles on the grounds and order in which students can be accepted into groups.

First priority is given to students belonging to the group for which a course is primarily aimed. Second come students for whom participation in teaching has been postponed for a valid reason (such as maternity leave or illness - employment is not considered a valid reason). If there is still room in a group, students aiming to speed up their studies can accepted. If a student is not a member of the teaching group for whom the course is specifically designed, s/he shall inform the teacher by, for instance, making a remark in the “additional data” of the entry form. In compulsory studies, the order of registration is not the same as the order of admission to the course. In optional studies, the students are admitted in the order of registration, unless instructed otherwise.

4.4 Language and communication studies

According to the Decree on University Degrees (794/2004), the student shall be able to prove that s/he has achieved skills in Finnish and Swedish such as are required for official positions requiring an academic degree in a bilingual district and are necessary from the viewpoint of the student’s field of work.

In addition, the student shall, upon completion of the degree, have skills in one foreign language such that enable him or her to follow developments in his or her field and to function in an international environment.

The student can show that s/he has achieved the required language skills through his or her previous studies or through studies forming part of the degree. Exception: The Professional English course in the ITE programme cannot be accredited with prior learning.

The following principles are applied when accreditation is considered:

1. Studies in the mother tongue (900070Y and 900075Y) need not be taken by a student who has completed at least the basic studies in Finnish in a university. Students in the ITE programme whose mother tongue is not Finnish shall agree with Johanna Lampinen on a way to gain the credits for 900077Y.

2. Compulsory studies taken in spoken and written skills in the mother tongue, second national language and foreign language, completed for a degree in another Finnish university or polytechnic, are accredited as if they had been taken in the Faculty of Education. If the studies taken elsewhere are more limited by scope than the equivalent studies in the Faculty, the Faculty may require supplementation.

3. Except for the spoken skills, the skills in a foreign language can be proved with the matriculation examination grades laudatur or eximia cum laude approbatur for the advanced syllabus in the language in question.

4. Skills in a foreign language can be proved with the IB, EB or Reifeprüfung diploma.

5. Skills in a foreign language can be proved with academic approbatur level studies or with a study module of at least 25 ECTS credits in that foreign language.

6. The basic studies in Nordic Philology/Finnish are approved as a substitute for the spoken and written skills in Swedish/Finnish as regards studies in the second national language. The above studies are considered to be indicative of satisfactory skills. As a proof of good skills, completion of both basic and intermediate studies in Nordic Philology/Finnish is required. Unfinished study modules are not sufficient to warrant accreditation, but the student can prove his or her language skills needed for the degree through tests arranged by the Languages and Communication unit, or take a summer course required for the degree. (Decree on the Demonstration of Proficiency in the Finnish and Swedish Languages in Civil Service (481/2003), sections 16(3,4) and 17(2,3).

7. Good spoken and written skills in the second national language can also be proved with a pass in Swedish or Finnish as a mother tongue in the matriculation examination, or in Finnish or Swedish as a second language with the grade laudatur, eximia cum laude approbatur or magna cum laude approbatur. (Decree on the Demonstration of Proficiency in the Finnish and Swedish Languages in Civil Service (481/2003), section 16(1).

8. A civil service language proficiency certificate awarded by an auxiliary member of the State Board of Language Examinations or by an examiner appointed by the National Board of Education, measuring spoken and written skills in Finnish or Swedish, which has been graded at least “satisfactory” (Decree 442/1987(3;2) and 481/2003(1) is sufficient as a proof of language skills required for the degree.

9. In the Faculty of Education, the Education Dean makes the decision on the language skills required of students who have received their basic education in a language other than Finnish or Swedish, or abroad (University of Oulu Rules of Educational Procedure, section 19 and Government Decree on University Degrees 19.8.2004/794, section 6). A student can apply for exemption from earning credits in the second national language. Having been granted the exemption, s/he shall complete a corresponding set of other language and communication studies. Before applying for exemption, s/he shall discuss the impact of an exemption on his/her eligibility for teaching duties in Finland with a coordinator of his/her studies, or with the Faculty’s lead specialist in academic affairs.

Accreditation for language and communication studies is within the sphere of either the Languages and Communication unit or the Faculty. The accreditation process is started with a discussion with the teacher-tutor or study advisor of your own degree programme. Accreditation for language and communication studies typically takes place by filling out an RPL form.

See https://osat.oulu.fi/index.php?lang=en_US.

4.5 Practice periods

All the degree programmes include practical training or teaching practice. The scope and content of the practice periods varies from one programme to the other. Certain principles and regulations apply to the practice periods in the various programmes, and the student agrees to follow them when s/he registers for them. Some prior information may also be required, before a student can participate in a practice period. For information on practical issues related to practice in your degree programme, consult the person in charge of the practice period, attend the practice information meetings, and see http://www.oulu.fi/edu/practices.

4.6 Free-choice studies

The programmes include a varying amount of free-choice (elective) studies. See www.oulu.fi/edu/elective_studies for a list of available courses that you can choose to study freely. Free-choice studies can also include courses offered by other faculties and universities.

4.7 Examinations

• The set books for the examination and methods of assessment are specified at the introduction to each course.

• Details on the examination(s) connected with a course are given during the course at the latest.

• A first exam and two repeat exams are organized for any lecture series connected with a course. Make sure to take part in the first exam or one of the repeats.

• Take care of any late examinations, retakes and compensation for missed exercises during the term that follows a course at the latest. Otherwise, the entire course shall be retaken. For exceptionally cogent reasons, a student may be granted extra time to complete a course. Take care to document yourself the parts of/times of attendance for an unfinished course.

• Any courses based on familiarization with literature, as well as the maturity test, can be sat on the Faculty’s general examination days.

General examination days in the academic year 20172018
Fridays 2 to 5 p.m. (L1)

Autumn term 2017:              Spring term 2018:

September 15                             January 19

October 13                                 February 16

November 17                              March 16

December 8                                April 13

                                                 May 18

Registrations for the general examinations shall be made at weboodi.oulu.fi/oodi no later than Thursday in the week preceding the exam.

If a student cannot arrive at an exam, s/he shall cancel the registration at least two days before the exam by sending an e-mail message to study.education@oulu.fi.

4.8 Publication of exam results

Exam results are published no later than three weeks after the teacher has received the exam papers for assessment. If the results cannot be published by this deadline, the teacher shall inform the students of the delay and the date for publishing the results before the expiry of the due date.

4.9 Faculty of Education ethical instructions

In issues related to ethics and equality, the Faculty of Education observes the instructions issued by the University of Oulu Equality Committee and Ethics Working Group. See www.oulu.fi/etiikka/ ja www.oulu.fi/tasa-arvo/.

Together with the Higher Education Development Committee, the Ethics Working Group has composed the ”Ethical instructions for teaching” with separate instructions for teachers and students. The instructions have been written in the first person, because ethicality means personal commitment of all involved.

Ethical instructions for the student

1. My main goal is to learn.

2. I am conscious of my role as a responsible actor in the scientific community. I will be an example to other students.

3. I take care of myself and my capacity to study, and I advance welfare and team spirit in my university community.

4. In my actions, I promote both my own and my fellow students’ learning. I do not just aim at rapidly getting done with my courses.

5. I recognize the worth of the work done by the others, and I always act with honesty. In my studies, I advance the criticalness, truthfulness, community and impartiality of my scientific community. Therefore,

• I do not cheat or use any kind of deception in teaching and exam situations,
• My work in courses, seminars and theses is my own production, unless it is about pair or group work, in which case the collaboration is evidenced by a list of authors or in some other way.
• I report any sources I have used and do not present as my own any information that is available on the Internet, for instance,
• I adapt to the fact that I am a member of a scientific community, and I understand that my individual requirements cannot always be met. I will thus not put any pressure on the other students or the staff to comply with them.

6. In a teaching situation or examination, I will not behave in a way that interferes with others’ learning and work.

7. I respect the teaching and research work of my teachers. Thus

• I contribute to teaching situations by being active and responsible,
• I give appropriate feedback on teaching,
• I follow the instructions given by my teachers in my work and I promote a positive atmosphere in teaching situations.

Ethical instructions for the teacher

1. My main goal is to advance the learning of my students. Thus

• I develop myself as a researcher and teacher,
• I treat my student equally and I assess their learning in an appropriate manner,
• I give recognition when a student’s work advances his/her own and others’ learning,
• I urge a student to change his/her way of working method, if it interferes with the others’ learning,
• I intervene as appropriate in deception, such as plagiarism or cheating in exams.

2. I am conscious of my role as a responsible actor in the scientific community. I am a positive example to my students and colleagues.

3. I take care of myself and my working capacity, and I advance welfare and team spirit in my academic community.

4. I value and develop my work as a teacher, and I advance the appreciation of teachers’ work in my department and university.

5. I am interested in the learning of my students. I respect their views and appropriate feedback given by them.

6. I will not try to take any undeserved gain from my students’ work efforts.

Most of the students in the Faculty pursue the pedagogical studies for teachers as part of their degree. Ethical issues in teacher education are made special by the fact that the when in teaching practice, the students are working in the functions of not only a student but also of a teacher and educator, which means that they already familiarize themselves with, among other things, teachers’ professional ethics at the start of their studies both in theory and in practice. Teaching practice calls for special ethical sensitivity from both the supervisors and the students. The supervisor’s example, attitudes and method of supervision have a great deal of influence on a young person’s self-esteem, motivation and ideas about a teacher’s work and his/her own capability to manage it. The way in which ethical issues are introduced during teaching practice, and opportunities are given to reflect on ethical questions in education, is important for an understanding of the value-bound nature of teachers’ work and the ethics of pedagogy. The teacher’s work is made ethically sensitive by the fact that it involves a long period of influence, and the collaborating partner is a child or a growing young person who, unlike an adult, is not able to look after his or her rights and evaluate whether a piece of information is right and diversified. It is up to the teacher to teach and guide for the right and good, but at the same time to be sensitive to the dangers posed by the exercise of power and manipulation. The teacher’s duties also require a good cooperation with the parents, and having a disciplinary educational discussion with them. Students of the Faculty of Education who do not pursue pedagogical studies for teachers also encounter and solve ethical questions in their practical training and future work. This is why they also need to be offered both an opportunity to develop a sensitivity to identify various ethical problems in the field of education, and tools to solve these problems.

Two principles can be derived from the above, with the first one affecting teachers and supervisors of (teaching) practice, and the second affecting students:

1. I remember that the student is also getting prepared for working life and acting in society. I supervise his/her practice in a discreet and responsible manner. I try to create a safe practice atmosphere, and to introduce the ethical nature of education and issues of professional ethics from different points of view.

2. Studying is also about getting prepared for working life and acting in society. I assume a responsible attitude to my work and apply myself to ethical issues in it also in general, but especially when I am working with children and young people.

Useful links:

University of Oulu instructions for dealing with cases of plagiarism: www.oulu.fi/urkund/

Finnish Advisory Board on Research Integrity: www.tenk.fi

Federation of Finnish Learned Societies: www.tsv.fi

Office of the Data Protection Ombudsman: www.tietosuoja.fi

Ethical Instructions for Professors: www.professoriliitto.fi

Teachers’ Professional Ethics: www.oaj.fi

Having acquired the right to pursue degree studies, a student who has completed the Bachelor’s degree in the same degree programme in another Finnish university can continue with the Master’s studies in the Faculty of Education at the University of Oulu, without pursuing any supplementary studies. In the teacher education programmes, however, it may be necessary to supplement a previous degree so far as the pedagogical studies for teachers are concerned.

If the student changes his or her major after the Bachelor’s degree, a student can typically continue with the advanced studies of the new major subject, if s/he has completed the intermediate studies in that subject when it was a minor. The student can be expected to supplement the studies of a previous minor, if the nature of a major and minor subject in the intermediate studies in the Bachelor’s degree differs remarkably from one another. In such a case, the student can be required to supplement the intermediate studies in the minor with a maximum of 10 credits of studies. The supplementary studies can then be counted towards the Master’s degree.

Any set of credits can only be counted towards a single university degree. The only exception to this rule is constituted by language, communication and orientation studies that can be credited based on a previous degree, and the basic and intermediate studies in the major subject and pedagogical studies included in another degree, which can be credited in accordance with the existing accreditation tables.

The student can be credited for studies taken in other Finnish or foreign universities or other educational institutions, and s/he is allowed to substitute courses with other courses that are not part of the degree programme, if the goals set for the degree are still achieved.

A basic rule followed in accreditation is that the credits earned in other Finnish and foreign universities are accepted towards the degree in full wherever applicable.

It is good to verify the accreditation of studies completed abroad by constructing a study plan in collaboration between the sending and receiving degree programmes. In this way, the studies taken abroad do not add to the period of time it takes for a student to finish his/her studies. If is often not possible to make a fully binding plan in advance. Changes to the study plan shall not, however, form an obstacle to the accreditation of studies taken abroad.

Recognition of prior learning (RPL)

According to the instructions provided by the Faculty, a student can also gain credits for the degree by other means than learning indicated by university studies, for instance, on the basis of work experience. Credits may be awarded if the competence acquired by other means is connected with the learning outcomes of the study modules or courses described in the curriculum of the programme. The student needs to be able to produce a certificate of the skill/knowledge and/or s/he shall be able to demonstrate it in some other way. For more on RPL, see www.oulu.fi/edu/rpl.

4.11 Staff members in charge of the programmes

Persons in charge have been nominated for degree programmes, specializations, study modules and courses. They make the decisions on accreditation and are responsible for the coordination of studies, but they do not necessary teach the courses in person.

Persons in charge by degree programme

Degree Programme in Teaching and Education, Minna Sääskilahti

Specializations:

  • Special Education, BA, Marjatta Takala
  • Intercultural Teacher Education, BA, Elina Lehtomäki
  • Educational Sciences, BA:
    • Major: Educational psychology, Hanni Muukkonen
    • Major: Education, Katariina Holma
    • Primary Teacher, BA, Minna Sääskilahti
    • Music Education, BA, Juha Ojala
    • Early Childhood Education, BA, Asko Pekkarinen

Master’s Programme in Special Education, Marjatta Takala

Specializations:

  • Special Kindergarten Teacher, Master’s Programme in Special Education, MA, Marjatta Takala
  • Special Education, MA, Marjatta Takala

Broadly Based Master’s Programme in Education, Mirka Hintsanen

Specializations:

  • Pedagogical Institutions and Expertise, MA, Mirka Hintsanen
  • Educational Psychology, MA, Hanni Muukkonen
  • Learning, Education and Technology (LET), MA, Sanna Järvelä
  • Education and Globalisation (EDGLO), MA, Elina Lehtomäki

Master’s Programme in Primary Teacher Education, Hanni Muukkonen

Specializations:

  • Master’s Programme for Primary Teacher Qualification, MA, Hanni Muukkonen
  • Primary Teacher Education, MA, Hanni Muukkonen
  • Intercultural Teacher Education, MA, Hanni Muukkonen

Master’s Programme in Music Education, Juha Ojala

  • Music Education, MA

4.12 Expiry of studies

It may be required that you shall supplement your knowledge in a study module completed more than ten years ago, when you are going on to study a hierarchically subsequent study module in a subject. The credits for such supplementary studies are counted towards the degree as part of a study module or in other studies.

Courses older than five years in unfinished study modules may need to be updated at the discretion of the person in charge of the subject in question. Courses taken over five years ago that are not accepted as part of a study module will be accepted as degree studies in the category of “other studies”.

4.13 Certificates

As soon as a student has completed all the studies required for a degree, s/he shall apply for confirmation of the degree by filling in the form available on the Faculty website. The application shall be returned to the study affairs secretary of the student’s own specialization or degree programme in Room KTK238 or KTK242 at least two (2) weeks prior to the date due for degree confirmation. A degree cannot be confirmed until 14 days after the thesis has been accepted.

All the credits to be included in the degree shall be listed in the degree confirmation application. For a student to graduate, s/he shall be enrolled for attendance at the university. The degree certificate can be collected from the study affairs secretary’s office on the degree confirmation day at the earliest. The certificate can also be sent by mail. For a special reason, the degree certificate can also be handed to a person authorized by the graduate. When the degree is final, a separate certificate will also be issued detailing the study modules that were not counted towards the degree.

On the last graduation day each term, in December and June, a diploma conferment ceremony is organized in which the graduates are distributed their degree certificates. For more information on graduation and application for a degree, see http://www.oulu.fi/edu/graduation/.

4.14 Student associations in the Faculty of Education

Student associations have the following duties:
• to see to and supervise the interests of their members in their academic, social, cultural and professional affairs;
• to organize leisure activities;
• to maintain contacts with various parties within and outside the Faculty and university;
• to support studying by means of various subsidies and scholarships; and
• to pursue non-profit publication and information activities.

Student associations in the Faculty

Lastarit
Student association for the early childhood education students. lastaritry.wordpress.com

Motiva
Student association for the education students. motiva.wordpress.com/

Mukava
Student association for the music education students. www.mukava.org/

Olo
Student association for the primary teacher education students. www.olory.net/

Spessu
Student association for the special education students. https://spessury.wordpress.com/

The collaborating partners include, among others, subject departments and student associations in other Finnish universities, the University of Oulu Student Union, other associations at the University of Oulu, the Teacher Student Union of Finland, the Trade Union of Education, Specia, as well as other societies and companies.

4.15 Teachers’ qualification requirements

Teaching Qualifications Decree (986/1998)

The decree enforced at the beginning of 1999 includes a compilation of enactments on the qualification requirements for head teachers and teachers referred to in the Basic Education Act, Vocational Education and Training Act, Vocational Adult Education Act, Liberal Adult Education Act and the Act on Basic Education in the Arts. For the decree, see www.finlex.fi.

4.16 University of Oulu Education Regulations

Programmes leading to a degree as well as all other education are governed by the University of Oulu Education Regulations. Much of what is detailed in this study guide, for instance, is based on these regulations.

For a currently valid set of these regulations, see http://www.oulu.fi/university/node/43459.

5. Assessment of studies

5.1 Bachelor’s and Master’s theses

To complete the Bachelor’s degree, the student shall compose a Bachelor’s thesis in the field of his or her major subject. For the Master’s degree, a Master’s thesis is written.

A Bachelor’s thesis can be written either alone or in pairs. A Master’s thesis can be the work of a single student or a joint effort of several students. For works written in pairs or in a group, it shall be possible to identify and assess each student’s individual contribution to the thesis.

In connection with the Bachelor’s and Master’s theses, the student also takes a written maturity test.

5.2 Publication of Bachelor’s and Master’s theses

A Bachelor’s and Master’s thesis is submitted to the thesis supervisor for a preliminary examination after it has been subjected to an assessment seminar. After the preliminary examination and when any corrections that may have been suggested in it have been made, the supervisor issues a permission in writing to upload the work to the Laturi system. Having received the Laturi permission, the student uploads his or her Bachelor’s or Master’s thesis to the system. After this, the thesis is transferred from the system for assessment.

5.3 Abstract of Bachelor’s and Master’s theses

The student shall compose an abstract for his or her Bachelor’s thesis before submitting it for assessment. The abstract of a Bachelor’s thesis is appended to the thesis after the cover page.

For a Master’s thesis, the student shall compose an abstract before submitting it for examination. The abstract is appended to the thesis after the cover page.

The abstract shall be written in popular style and good language. It shall present the background of the study, the research problems, research methods used, main research results, and conclusions based on them, with evaluations or reliability and generalizability. The study must also be described with keywords.

For more detailed instructions, see http://www.oulu.fi/edu/theses.

5.4 Maturity test and its assessment

For the Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees, the student shall pass the maturity test to show familiarity with the field of his/her study as well as skills in Finnish or Swedish. The student need not demonstrate skills in Finnish or Swedish for a Master’s degree, when s/he has shown his/her skills in the same language in a maturity test for the Bachelor’s degree. The maturity test for the Master’s degree is substituted by the abstract of the Master’s thesis, if the student has passed the maturity test in his/her Bachelor’s degree.

The maturity test is taken on a general examination day of the Faculty. For the maturity test, the thesis supervisor gives 2-3 topics related to the field of the thesis. One of the topics is based on literature agreed on with the student on the subject area of the thesis, while the other two are more generally related to the range of themes covered by the thesis. The student shall choose one of these topics. The maturity test comprises an essay of about four pages on the chosen topic. The essay is written on every line of the test paper. The maturity test shall show good skills in the student’s mother tongue and familiarity with the range of topics covered by the thesis.

The maturity test is written in the language in which the student received his/her school education. If the thesis was written in a language other than Finnish or Swedish, and the student has received her/his school education in a language other than Finnish or Swedish, the maturity test shall be taken in the same language in which the student wrote the thesis.

The student can register for the maturity test once the supervisor of his/her Bachelor’s thesis has given permission to publish the thesis on Laturi. The maturity test for a Master’s thesis (i.e. the abstract of the thesis) is submitted to the supervisor before permission to upload the thesis to Laturi is given. Having accepted the abstract, the supervisor will submit it and the Laturi permission to the study affairs secretary in Room KTK242 (Bachelor’s theses) or KTK238 (Master’s theses).

The maturity test can help to verify student’s mastery of certain areas of his/her thesis, and in borderline cases it can thus have an influence on thesis assessment. That is why the thesis can only be approved after the maturity test has been accepted.

The maturity test is examined for both language and content by the supervisor of the Bachelor’s/Master’s thesis. If the maturity test is rejected, the examiner will give the student feedback on it before registration for a new test. Maturity tests written in Swedish are examined by the university’s Language and Communication Services.

For formal and language requirements of the maturity test, see http://www.oulu.fi/edu/theses.

5.5 Assessment of Bachelor’s theses

The thesis is written individually or in pairs, but when working on the thesis, the student should make use of collaborative working methods in various ways and put an emphasis on collaborative development of his/her scientific activity and thinking. A staff member with teaching duties in the particular discipline is in charge of the Bachelor’s thesis, together with the other members of the scientific community.

When a Bachelor’s thesis is assessed, attention is paid to the author’s ability to compose a written scientific report. The thesis shall evidence the researcher’s ability to formulate a relevant research problem and elaborate the problem setting in accordance with the theoretical and methodological principles of scientific research, and an ability to choose literature that is appropriate from these points of view. The response to the research problem can be based solely on literature on the relevant thematic area, or it can be supplemented with small-scale empirical experiments. The assessment focuses on the general criteria for the evaluation of theses, also taking into account the special traits of the discipline represented by the thesis.

The Bachelor’s thesis is approved by a senior assistant, postdoctoral researcher, lecturer or equivalent representing the discipline of the thesis. The thesis is graded on a scale from 0 to 5.

For the assessment criteria of Bachelor’s theses, see http://www.oulu.fi/edu/theses.

5.6 Examination of Master’s theses

The primary examiner is usually the leader of the Master’s thesis group or thesis supervisor, who requests some other person to act as a second examiner. If the thesis is about to receive the lowest or highest grade, or if the thesis is about to receive a fail, the primary examiner proposes that a third examiner be appointed. The proposal is addressed to the person responsible for the degree programme. The third examiner shall come from a different research group than the primary and secondary examiners.

The examiners give a written statement on the thesis within one month of having received it, proposing approval of and a grade for the thesis, or failing it. The final decision on approval and the grade or fail is made by the Education Dean.

The thesis is graded on a scale from 0 to 5. A thesis written in a minor subject is graded by the professor of the major subject on a scale from 0 to 5.

5.7 Assessment criteria for the Master’s thesis

The assessment of Master’s theses focuses on the general criteria for assessment on the one hand, and tries to take into account the special characteristics of different types of studies on the other. The general assessment criteria cover the following areas:

  • theoretical background of the study and familiarity with relevant literature,
  • research problem and how it was justified,
  • choice and use of research methods,
  • data collection and analysis,
  • presentation and interpretation of results,
  • evaluation of the reliability of the study,
  • conclusions,
  • discussion and consideration of research ethics,
  • use of language and sources

A pass for the thesis is given on a scale from 1 to 5:

1 = sufficient

The theoretical background is quite limited, one-sided and unclear. There are lots of issues, shortcomings and obvious mistakes in the thesis. The research results have been presented in a superficial, summary and listlike manner. The discussion does not reach the level of independent interpretation. The work as a whole is quite poor and unfinished.

2 = satisfactory

The theoretical background is loosely connected with the research problems, and the use of empiricism is mechanical and deficient. There is a lot of good in the study, but there are also obvious shortcomings. The use of research methods is formalistic and unstructured. There are errors in the analysis, and there are also obvious shortcomings in the language and form of the thesis. Although the discussion is quite limited as a whole, it does include references to possible applications.

3 = good

The student has acquainted him/herself thoroughly with the theoretical background. S/he has processed the data well and almost faultlessly. There can be some minor fumbling in some important part of the study. The results clearly provide answers to the goals set for the study. The language and form of the thesis are good and consistent.

4 = very good

The student has acquainted him/herself well with the theoretical background, and his/her use of literature is varied and critical. S/he has been using methods in an expert manner. His/her interpretation of the results is consistent and has a high quality. S/he masters the scientific practices of reporting, layout and language issues and ethical discussion. The discussion is autonomous, analytical and creative.

5 = excellent

The thesis is extremely clear in structure, and shows a very deep knowledge of the discipline of science. The theoretical background is praiseworthy and varied and has a high quality. The connection between theory and empiricism is very strong. The methodological analyses have a high quality, they are independent and well justified. The use of sources is selective, abundant and critical. The concepts have been defined well and they have been used properly and clearly. The research data is appropriate for the study. The data has been classified and analyzed well and faultlessly, creating new knowledge. The main results have been put together exceptionally well and they have been evaluated critically. The study shows an autonomous grasp, and it follows good scientific practices. The study features numerous new observations. The thesis as a whole is excellent and consistent in style.

5.8 Assessment of other studies

A numerical scale of integers from 0 to 5 is used in course assessment as follows

5 = excellent
4 = very good
3 = good
2 = satisfactory
1 = sufficient
0 = fail

A course can also be graded on the scale pass/fail. An exception is formed by the courses in the second national language, which are graded satisfactory/good.

The grades for entire study modules are based on means weighted with the scope of each course. The Bachelor’s degree assessed on the scale 0-5 is included in the mean. The grade for the Master’s thesis is not included in the mean.

When the means for the major subjects in a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree or for other study modules are calculated, courses graded pass/fail are not included.

Means for the study modules:

scale of means                              grade
4.50 – 5.00                                    excellent (5)
3.50 – 4.49                                    very good (4)
2.50 – 3.49                                    good (3)
1.50 – 2.49                                    satisfactory (2)
1.00 – 1.49                                    sufficient (1)

6. Student counselling

6.1 Counselling at the University of Oulu

General information about studies meant for all students is available from the following sources, among others:

• Faculties’ study guides and websites
• Oulu University student magazine Ylkkäri
• Student Union calendar
www.oulu.fi/yliopisto

Oulu University Student Union (OYY)

The Oulu University Student Union is an interest and service organization for all students studying for a basic degree, promoting the students’ welfare and possibilities to pursue studies through its activities both directly and through its subject and hobby organizations. In issues related to the supervision of students’ interests, get in touch with the student union at oyy@oyy.fi.

IT administration services for students
http://www.oulu.fi/th/opiskelijat

neuvonta(at)oulu.fi

Library services

The Oulu University Library is a scientific library that is open to everyone. See http://www.oulu.fi/kirjasto/

Finnish Student Health Service (YTHS)

Oulu Health Centre
Yliopistokatu 1 A, 90570 Oulu 
www.yths.fi

Evaluation of need for medical treatment and appointment with physician: A public health nurse will make an assessment of need for treatment, gives instructions for treatment, and refers to further examinations as necessary, such as an emergency appointment with a general practitioner. For instructions on how to get treatment, see the instructions on the YTHS website.

6.2. Student counselling in the Faculty of Education

The students can get information, counselling and guidance related to studies from, among others, the Faculty’s lead expert in academic affairs, study affairs secretaries, programme coordinators and teachers of the various subjects. Each new student is also appointed a small group tutor and teacher tutor who help the students at the start of their studies and all along their study paths.

The study administration staff can be reached at study.education@oulu.fi and firstname.lastname@oulu.fi.

For the contact information of the Faculty of Education staff, see www.oulu.fi/ktk/yhteystiedot.

6.3 Small group tutoring

The goal of small group tutoring is to coach a new student as an active member of the academic community. The supervisors are senior students who familiarize the students with the practices of their own field of studies, the faculty and the entire university, but above all with their fellow students and Oulu. Small group tutoring is part of the course called “Orientation to the studies” which has its own timeslot in the timetable. It is meant for all new students in the Faculty.

It is absolutely important for a student to take part in the introductory information sessions. If a student cannot attend, though, s/he can get the necessary information about the small group s/he belongs to and about his/her tutor from the study advisor of the degree programme.

Last updated: 12.12.2017