Dissertations in progress

Jouni Ahmajärvi: Gunnar Landtman as a Researcher of Social Inequality and as a Social Activist

Jouni Ahmajärvi studies Gunnar Landtman’s sociological studies on social inequality and social classes in his doctoral dissertation. He also analyses Landtman’s ways of utilising scientific knowledge in the social debates on human rights, democracy, and death penalty in Finland. Ahmajärvi’s dissertation will be the first study focusing especially on Landtman’s sociology. Ahmajärvi will defend his thesis in the autumn of 2016. He is a member of the research project The Intellectual Landscape of the Westermarckian Circle, which is funded by The Society of Swedish Literature in Finland (SLS)

 

Kaisa Harju: Exporting Expertise: Somalia-Finland Tuberculosis Control Support and Training Project, 1980–1990

In her thesis, Kaisa Harju examines how Somalia-Finland Tuberculosis Control Project was constructed as a cross-cultural development aid project, focusing on its content, characteristic forms of interactions and impact. Harju’s research sheds light on how medical practices were transferred from one culture to another and how successful these attempts were.

 

Jouni Huhtanen: The astronomical revolution. Theories, interpretations and frames, 1900-1991

This dissertation examines some 20th century theories and interpretations of the astronomical revolution. The research deals with scientific and philosophical explanations of the revolution, concepts of the "great tradition" and the mathematical and theoretical content of the 17th century astronomy. The study will be completed at the end of year 2015.

 

Sami Heikkinen: The depictions of the Cold War and the political and cultural transition of Great Britain in years 1945 – 1991 by British spy literature.

In his dissertation Sami Heikkinen studies the depictions of four famous British espionage fiction authors, Ian Fleming, John le Carré, Len Deighton and Graham Greene, considering the Cold War and the changing political and cultural roles and positions of Great Britain between 1945 and 1991.

 

Hanna Honkamäkilä: Scientific co-operation between the University of Oulu and the United States, 1959 - 2000

The aim of this doctoral thesis is to examine scientific co-operation between the University of Oulu and the United States and to discuss what kind of influences to the development of the University of Oulu came from the United States. A related aim is to reflect the possible impacts of scientific co-operation on the Oulu region and on Finland.

 

Suvi Kuokkanen: The Moral and Social Aspects of Athenian Ostrakismos

In her doctoral thesis, Suvi Kuokkanen studies the moral and social aspects of the origin and use of ostrakismos in archaic and classical Athens. She examines the interrelationship between ostrakismos, the ideal of political equality, and the fear of hybris and supernatural intervention under democracy. The source material includes earlier Greek literature, historiography, philosophy, drama, and forensic oratory.

 

Ilkka Lähteenmäki: Historical Texts as Worlds. Implications and uses of conceptualizing historical texts through the theory of possible worlds

Possible world semantics have affected philosophy widely, but the philosophy of history has been so far left largely untouched. The dissertation focuses on analyzing historiographical representations through possible world semantics. This is done by treating different forms of historical representations or ‘texts’ (as understood widely) as worlds. Different forms of representation (traditional academic writing, historical fiction, video games that are set in “historical worlds”, social media projects e.g. YLE’s #sota39 –project) all offer history, but there seems to be a relative large variety in how this historicality is actually generated. The dissertation will be finished in 2018

 

Katariina Parhi: History of psychopathy in Finland

Katariina Parhi examines the history of psychopathy in twentieth-century Finland. Parhi studies the factors that have been seen as causal factors in psychopathy and analyses how the psychopathy diagnosis has been used in medical debates and clinical work throughout the twentieth century. She examines how patients diagnosed as psychopaths have been treated in Finland, and on what grounds these individuals were diagnosed psychopaths in the first place. Parhi’s research will clarify the complicated relationship between psychopathy, other mental disorders and forms of maladjustment, including criminality. Above all, it will analyse how the use of the diagnosis reflects changing views on normality and ways to adapt citizens to society and its value system.

She is a member of the research project Mental Health, Medicine and Social Engineering in 20th Century Finland, which is funded by the Kone Foundation and the Research Centre Eudaimonia's Doctoral Programme.

 

Annukka Sailo: Women’s Aggression and the Evolution Debate in the United States and Finland from the 1960s to the 1980s

This research examines the highly gendered debate over the cultural vs. evolutionary determinants of human aggression. Preliminary, the doctoral thesis will be submitted for review in 2017.

She is a member of the research project Mental Health, Medicine and Social Engineering in 20th Century Finland, which is funded by the Kone Foundation and the Research Centre Eudaimonia's Doctoral Programme.

 

Ville Salminen: History of Psychosurgery in Finland

In his doctoral dissertation, Salminen examines the history of psychosurgery (the use of neurosurgery for mental disorders) in Finland from the late 1940s to the late 1990s.

 

Samu Sarviaho: The Treaty of Nöteborg (Pähkinäsaari) in conceptions of Finnish History

In his doctoral thesis, Samu Sarviaho examines the various conceptions of the controversial treaty of Nöteborg, signed between Sweden and Novgorod in 1323. He focuses on the conceptions of the treaty in Finnish historiography as well as in Finnish history culture, ca. 1850-1999. The thesis is expected to be completed in 2016.

 

Niina Timosaari: Gender and Sexuality in the Scientific Work of Edvard Westermarck (1862-1939)

The main research object of my study is to analyse the ways through which science has been used to challenge, reproduce or comment upon the contemporary norms and definitions of gender and sexuality. In my PhD project Gender and Sexuality in the Scientific Work of Edward Westermarck (1862-1939) I contemplate the manner in which the Finnish, internationally well-known sociologist and philosopher Edward Westermarck discussed the contemporary issues of gender and sexuality in his scientific work. My research examines the intersections of Westermarck's social and scientific views on gender and provides valuable insight into the gender history of science and ideas and especially into the two major disputes in the late 19th and early 20th century Western Europe: the emancipation of women and the controversy over the relationship between the church and the state. She is a member of the research project The Intellectual Landscape of the Westermarckian Circle, which is funded by The Society of Swedish Literature in Finland (SLS).
 

Last updated: 10.12.2015