We are proud to announce the keynote speakers for the COACT Conference 2019

Professor Jon Hindmarsh, King's College London
Professor Rodney Jones, University of Reading
Adjunct Professor Leena Kuure, University of Oulu
Professor Paul McIlvenny, Aalborg University

The invited keynote speakers will address the conference theme from their respective viewpoints.


Professor Jon Hindmarsh, King's College London
Teamwork in flux: Interactional practices and new technologies

In any work site, interactional practices are necessarily entangled with the tools and technologies of the local trade. This means that the ways in which we instruct, request, demonstrate or coordinate are fundamentally bound up with relevant features of the local material environment. Thus, when tools or technologies used by participants change in significant ways, these sorts of interactional practices become entangled with a reconfigured sociomaterial landscape or ecology. Therefore, I suggest that the interactional organisation of workplace activities cannot be understood without detailed consideration of these ecologies. In this presentation, I will attempt to reveal examples of these sociomaterial entanglements – and to unpack the reflexive relationship between conduct and material context – and highlight both their academic and applied significance. To do so, I will draw on the analysis of audio-video data from a study of teamwork and coordination in robot-assisted surgery.


Professor Rodney Jones, University of Reading
Information games

In this talk I will discuss Goffman’s (1959) notion of ‘information games’ as a basis for the analysis of social interaction, especially with regard to the way people regulate privacy and disclosure in digitally mediated environments such as social media sites.

I will begin with an overview of the use of game theory as a tool for the analysis of decision making in the social sciences, as well as examples of where it has been used in pragmatics and sociolinguistics. I will then explore the ways Goffman’s interactional approach based on the dynamic negotiation of different ‘territories of the self’ (1971) differs from game theoretic approaches. Then I will build upon Goffman’s ideas with a model that understands information games as unfolding at the intersection of 1) the social situation (and the possibilities for mutual monitoring that it makes available for social actors), 2) the power relations between participants, 3) the way obligations for reciprocity develop in the ongoing ‘back and forth’ of interaction, and 4) the role of ‘affect’ in participants’ engagement in the ‘game’.

Finally, I will turn to a discussion of digitally mediated interactions, both between human participants and between humans and computer software, and explore how the interfaces and backend capabilities of different platforms and programmes can influence the four aspects of information games that I talked about in the previous section, namely, context, power, contingent obligations and affect. In this discussion I will engage with a range of examples from cybersex to dating apps to online personality quizzes to permission dialogues that ask users to allow software vendors access to various hardware or information stored on their computers or mobile phones, specifically exploring how information games between individuals change when additional (sometimes invisible) participants are involved (such as internet companies or hackers, who also have a stake in gathering information from users). I will end the talk with some thoughts about how principles from interactional sociolinguistics can inform the design of apps and interfaces that can remedy the problems of information asymmetry and information ‘leakage’.

References

Goffman, E. (1959). The presentation of self in everyday life. New York: Doubleday.
Goffman, E. (1971). Relations in public: microstudies of the public order. Harper & Row.


Adjunct Professor Leena Kuure, University of Oulu
Capturing complexity in change: Theoretical and methodological challenges

Researchers have been increasingly interested in the study of everyday life broadening their focus from controlled sets of data to the world around them more broadly. Notions such as complexity and change and their relationship with the fast pace of technology development are often used in characterising the research interest or the rationale for the study.  The aim of this paper is to explore what is going on in the academia in relation to these notions from a theoretical and methodological perspective. Discourses and scene surveys will be the basis for the analysis leading to a more detailed scrutiny of research in the field of applied language studies.


Professor Paul McIlvenny, Aalborg University
Staging and inhabiting spatial video and audio data: Towards a scenographic turn in the analysis of complex sites of social interaction and discourse

When we collect and analyse video recordings of social interaction, we are often squeezed into a 2D planar representation of the social and material world. Recently, consumer versions of the passive 360° and stereoscopic omni-directional camera with spatial audio have come to market, but there is a paucity of tools to help us natively view, edit and analyse the resulting video and audio footage while adhering to a methodological perspective that focuses on the qualitative analysis of social interaction and discourse. In contrast, my presentation  reports on the development of two iterative software prototypes that support tangible and immersive engagement with current (and future) spatial video and audio recordings. SQUIVE (“Staging Qualitative Immersive Virtualisation Engine”) facilitates interactive and  immersive 3D reconstructions of the site and the scenes in which social and cultural practices took place over time. Through a tangible interface in virtual reality, CAVA360VR (“Collaborate, Annotate, Visualise, Analyse 360° video in VR”) enables the exploration of complex spatial video and audio recordings of a single scene in which social interaction occurred. It is argued that the resulting toolkit – and the analytical possibilities afforded by taking a ‘scenographic turn’ to Big Video – expands the range of abductive-inductive analytical  potentials that lie between data collection and close analysis. It leads to a complementary mode of collecting, engaging, sharing, collaborating and archiving mixed video data. Furthermore, it provides a resource for live performance of enhanced visual argumentation for qualitative analysis.

Viimeksi päivitetty: 27.1.2019