cover picture of  the journal based on the image by Barth van Rossum

NMR techniques help the identification of extracellular nanoparticles

Study demonstrates that diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method enables the determination of a very broad distribution of extracellular nanoparticles,
ranging from 1 to 500 nm. 

In the current purification protocols of exosomes, many smaller and larger nanoparticles such as lipoproteins, exomers and microvesicles are typically co-isolated. Particle size distribution is one important characteristics of EV samples, as it reflects the cellular origin of EVs and the purity of the isolation. However, most of the physicochemical analytical methods today cannot illustrate the smallest exosomes and other small particles like the exomers. Here, the study demonstrates that diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method enables the determination of a very broad distribution of extracellular nanoparticles, ranging from 1 to 500 nm. The range covers sizes of all particles included in EV samples after isolation. The method is non-invasive, as it does not require any labelling or other chemical modification.  EVs  were secreted from milk as well as embryonic kidney and renal carcinoma cells.

This new paper published by Kvantum Institute's Pricipal Investigators' groups in NMR Research Unit and Laboratory of Developmental Biology at the Univeristy of Oulu in the journal  Chemical Science (The Royal Society of Chemistry). Study was a research work in collaboration with the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) and German collaborators.

Md Sharif Ullah,a Vladimir V. Zhivonitko,a Anatoliy Samoylenko,b Artem Zhyvolozhnyi,b Sirja Viitala,c Santeri Kankaanpaa,c Sanna Komulainen,a Leif Schroder, de Seppo J. Vainio b and Ville-Veikko Telkki a
Identification of extracellular nanoparticle subsets by nuclear magnetic resonance  Chem. Sci., 2021,12, 8311-8319
Link to the paper:  https://doi.org/10.1039/d1sc01402a 

a NMR Research Unit, University of Oulu, Finland.
b Laboratory of Developmental Biology, Infotech Oulu, Oulu Center for Cell-Matrix Research, Kvantum Institute, Faculty of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Oulu, Finland.
c Production Systems, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Jokioinen, Finland.
d Molecular Imaging, Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut fur Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP), Berlin, Germany.
e Division of Translational Molecular Imaging, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.

Last updated: 8.7.2021