Thesis defence in the University of Oulu

Doctoral Candidate

Licentiate of Dentistry Päivi Jussila

Faculty and research unit

University of Oulu Graduate School, Faculty of Medicine, Research Unit of Oral Health Sciences
+358 294 48 0000

Field of study

Prosthetic dentistry and stomatognathic physiology

Date and time of the thesis defence

29.5.2019 12:00

Place of the thesis defence

Auditorium F202 of the Faculty of Medicine (Aapistie 5 B), Oulu.

Topic of the dissertation

Prevalence and associated risk factors of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC) 1966.

Opponent

Professor Timo Närhi, University of Turku, Department of Dentistry

Custos

Professor Aune Raustia, Faculty of Medicine, Research Unit of Oral Health Sciences , University of Oulu

Prevalence and associated risk factors of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC) 1966.

Clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and pain-related subjective symptoms were found to have a statistically significant association with a poor self-reported health condition as well as with painful general health problems. Occlusal disturbances were associated with pain on palpation in the masticatory muscles and in the temporomandibular joints. The prevalence of TMD signs among the examined cohort subjects was 34.2%; women had clinical signs of TMD more often than men. During 2012–2013 altogether 1 962 cohort subjects at the age of 46 years (1 050 women, 912 men) responded to questionnaires and participated in a clinical medical and dental examination.

Clicking in the temporomandibular joints and pain in the masticatory muscles are the most common symptoms and signs of TMD. Other frequently reported symptoms are headache, facial pain, and symptoms in the ears. A correlation between increased use of health care services and a need for TMD treatment has been shown. Counseling and self-care have shown to relieve pain and reduce the need for treatment. Material of Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC) 1 966 is significantly large and the findings here are useful when diagnosing and treating TMD patients.

Dissertation

Last updated: 24.5.2019