Henna Karvonen

Combining experimental cell and molecular biology to clinical research is the key to discover new therapies to respiratory diseases

Henna Karvonen

Henna Karvonen

PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow
Cell and molecular biology of respiratory diseases

Biography

I am a biochemist by training. I am experienced in translational and basic science of pulmonary patho-biology. I have demonstrated skills in cell and tissue imaging, both light and electron microscopy, the use of mouse lung fibrosis model, novel cell culture matrices, co-culture approaches and translational application of laboratory findings to human material.

The fields of my knowledge are matrix biology and immunology. My studies increase understanding of the cell biological mechanisms behind lung diseases, and these results offer a new kind of tool for diagnostics and research of pulmonary disorders.

In my Master and PhD studies, I gained expertise in cell and molecular biology of respiratory diseases focusing on the role of myofibroblasts in lung fibrosis, lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

As a postdoctoral fellow I expanded my professional skills in the fundamental science of lung diseases at the University of Toronto and gained deeper insight how lung fibrosis develops. The study defines how physical cell contacts between myofibroblasts and macrophages contribute to pro-fibrotic transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signalling in fibrosis.

 

Research interests

  • Lung fibrosis
  • Chronic inflammation and fibrosis
  • Macrophage biology
  • Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and its activation

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Research visits

  • Visiting Scientist
    1.4.2015 to 15.6.2015

    Introductory visit to Laboratory of Tissue Repair and Regeneration led by prof Boris Hinz at University of Toronto. 

  • Postdoctoral Fellow
    1.9.2015 to 31.8.2018

    Three year-long postdoctoral research period in Laboratory of Tissue Repair and Regeneration led by prof Boris Hinz at University of Toronto. The fellowship was funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research and Academy of Finland.