Conducting Research with Teens: Methods and Findings in Adolescent Online Safety

Lecturer: 
Dr. Pamela Wisniewski, pamwis@ucf.edu
Lecturer's institute: 
University of Central Florida, USA
Date: 
25.9.2019 09:15 to 27.9.2019 16:15

REGISTRATION

  • There is room for 20 students in the course. The slots will be filled in order of applications
  • Registration via email: heidi.hartikainen@oulu.fi

SCHEDULE AND LOCATION

  • Wednesday 25.9.2019, 09.15-16.15: Tellus Frost Club
  • Thursday 26.9.2019, 09.15-16.15: Tellus Frost club
  • Friday 27.9.2019, 09.15-16.15: Tellus Frost club

SPEAKERS

Dr. Pamela Wisniewski, Assistant Professor, University of Central Florida, USA
Dr. Heidi Hartikainen, Post-Doctoral Researcher, University of Oulu, Finland

ORGANIZERS

Dr. Netta livari, Professor, University of Oulu, Finland

Interact research unit, University of Oulu, Finland (Interact.oulu.fi)

Infotech doctoral programme (https://www.oulu.fi/infotech/)

OVERVIEW

This course will introduce students to research in the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) on the topic of adolescent online safety and risk. It combines lectures with hands-on activities and small group discussions on different empirical approaches to conducting research about and with teens. Students will learn user-centered approaches to conducting research with teens (ages 13-17). The aim is for students to be able to thoughtfully engage in issues around adolescent online safety, formulate well-informed research questions, and design a study in which to answer these questions. Students will also be given the opportunity to work with existing data sets to get practice analyzing data collected from teens. By the end of the course, each student will have:

  • Multiple research lectures of the topic of adolescent online safety
  • A repository of current research papers on adolescent online safety
  • An overview of empirical methods for conducting research with teens (e.g., interviews, surveys, diary studies, online digital trace data, and participatory design)
  • A fleshed-out research study design in which they could choose to pursue this line inquiry in collaboration with the speakers after the conclusion of the course

 

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

Day 1: Wednesday 25.9. 2019, 09.15-16.15: Tellus Frost club

Time

Topic

Readings

9:15 – 09:45

Introduction, warm-up

 

9:45 – 10:30

Introduction to Adolescent Online Safety

  • How is the topic conceptualized?
  • Who has been studied?
  • What approaches have been used?

Pinter et al. 2017

Hartikainen et al. 2015

Hartikainen et al. 2016

10:30 – 11:00

Coffee Break

 

11:00 – 12:00

Working with Teen as Human Subjects

  • Identifying and recruiting
  • Informed consent and other ethical principles

Poole & Peyton 2013

 

12:00 –12:30

Activity: group discussion

 

12:30 – 14:00

Lunch

 

14:00 – 15:00

Activity: Research Project Conceptualization

  • Identify possible research questions of interest to the group

 

15:00 – 15:45

Presentation: Share your initial thoughts with larger group

 

15.45 – 16:15

Padlet Feedback

  • What did you learn, what was left unclear?
  • Questions for lecturers

 

Day 2: Thursday 26.9. 2019, 09.15-16.15: Tellus Frost club

Time

Topic

Readings

9:15 – 09:30

Going through student feedback, answering questions

 

9:30 – 09:45

Overview of Empirical HCI Research Methods

 

9:30 – 10:30

Conducting Interwies with Teens and Parents

  • Benefits and drawbacks
  • Survey development
  • Analyzing the data & reporting results

Badillo-Urquiola et al. 2019

Erickson et al. 2016 Wisniewski et al. 2014

10:30 – 11:00

Coffee Break

 

11:00 – 12:30

Conducting Surveys with Teens and Parents

  • Benefits and drawbacks
  • Best Practices
  • Analyzing the data & reporting results

Ghosh et al. 2018a Hartikainen et al 2017 Wisniewski et al. 2015a

Wisniewski et al. 2015b

12:30 –14:00

Lunch

 

14:00 – 15:00

Activity: Research Project Conceptualization

  • Exploring existing interview and survey data Formulate your own study design

 

15:00 – 15:45

Presentation: Share your study design with larger group

 

15:45 – 16:15

Padlet Feedback

  • What did you learn, what was left unclear?
  • Questions for lecturers

 

 

Day 3: 27.9.2019, 09.15-16.15: Tellus Frost club

Time

Topic

Readings

9:15– 09:30

Going through feedback, answering student questions

 

9:30 – 10:00

Participatory Design with Teens

  • What is participatory design
  • Common techniques
  • Incorporating PD into research

Badillo-Urquiola et al. 2019

10:30 – 11:00

Coffee Break

 

11:00 – 12:30

Conducting Diary Studies with Teens and Parents

  • Types of diaries
  • Data collection
  • Analysis of diary data

Wisniewski et al. 2016 Wisniewski et al. 2017a McHugh et al. 2017

12:30 – 14:00

Lunch

 

14:00 – 15:00

Other Empirical Research Methods

  • Analyzing digital trace data
  • Feature analyses
  • App development and user studies

Ghosh et al. 2018b

Wisniewski et al. 2017b

Ghosh et al. 2019 (in press)

15:00 – 15:45

Activity: Research Project Conceptualization

  • Refine research questions
  • Refine study design
  • Analyze existing data sets (optional)

 

15:45 – 16:15

Presentation: Share with larger group

 

After the course

Feedback about the course

 

 

ECTS CREDITS AND MODE OF DELIVERY

2 ECTS (54 hours of work) from this course consisting of preliminary readings and an essay (20h), 3 day workshop comprised of lectures and exercises 20h, research study design formulated based on the course 14h.

ASSESMENT METHODS AND CRITERIA

To receive 2 ECTS for the course full participation during the workshop is required, as well as successful contribution to the work and presentations during the course (50% of the grade). Research study design based on the readings and the material produced during the course (50% of the grade).                                                                                                                  

GRADING

Pass-Fail

PRE-ASSIGNMENT

Get familiar with the papers on the readings list and write an essay (max 3 pages) where you: a) Introduce yourself, your study background and your research interests. Also include a fun fact about yourself, that you wouldn’t mind sharing with the rest of the group! b) Reflect on what the concept adolescent online safety means to you, and what kind of research related to this topic you could see yourself doing. Draw upon at least 5 papers from the reading list that you find interesting. And finally, c) Explain what your expectations from this course are, and what you are hoping to learn.

Return the essay to Heidi via email before 22.9 (heidi.hartikainen@oulu.fi).

READINGS

  1. Ashktorab, Z., and Vitak, J. 2016. Designing Cyberbullying Mitigation and Prevention Solutions through Participatory Design with Teenagers. In Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2016). San Jose, CA.
  2. Badillo-Urquiola, K., Smriti, D., McNally, B., Bonsignore, E., Golub, E., and Wisniewski, P. (2019) “’Stranger Danger!’ Social Media App Features Co-designed with Children to Keep Them Safe Online,” In the 2019 ACM Conference on Interaction Design and Children (IDC 2019), Boise, ID.
  3. Badillo-Urquiola, K., Page, X., and Wisniewski, P. (2019) “Risk vs. Restriction: The Tension between Providing a Sense of Normalcy and Keeping Foster Teens Safe Online,” In the Proceedings of the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2018), Glasgow, UK.
  4. Erickson, L., Wisniewski, P., Xu, H. Carroll, J.M., Rosson, M.B., and Perkins, D.F. (2016) “The Boundaries Between: Parental Involvement in a Teen’s Online World,” Journal of the Association of Information Science and Technology, 67(6) pp. 1384-1403. doi: 10.1002/asi.23450
  5. Ghosh, A.K., Badillo-Urquiola, K., Xu, H., Rosson, M.B., Carroll, J.M., and Wisniewski, P. (2018a) “A Matter of Control or Safety? Examining Parental Use of Technical Monitoring Apps on Teens’ Mobile Devices.” In the Proceedings of the 2018 ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2018), Montreal, Canada.
  6. Ghosh, A.K., Badillo-Urquiola, K., Guha, S., LaViola, J.J., and Wisniewski, P. (2018b) “Safety vs. Surveillance: What Teens Have to Say about Mobile Apps for Parental Control.” In the Proceedings of the 2018 ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2018), Montreal, Canada.
  7. Hartikainen, H., Iivari, N., & Kinnula, M. (2015). Children and Web 2.0: What they do, what we fear, and what is done to make them safe. In: Oinas-Kukkonen, H., Iivari, N., Kuutti, K., Öörni, A., Rajanen, M. (eds). Nordic contributions in IS research. Lecture notes in Business Information Processing, vol 223. Springer, Cham.
  8. Hartikainen, H., Iivari, N. and Kinnula, M. (2016) Should We Design for Control, Trust or Involvement?: A Discourses Survey about Children's Online Safety. In Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children (IDC 2016). Manchester, UK.
  9. Hartikainen, H., Kinnula, M., Livari, N., and Rajanen, D. 2017. Finding common ground: comparing children's and parents' views on children's online safety. In Proceedings of the 31st British Computer Society Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2017).
  10. McHugh, B.C., Wisniewski, P., Xu, H., Rosson, M.B., and Carroll, J.M. (2017) “Most Teens Bounce Back: A Longitudinal Analysis Demonstrating How Teens Recover Quickly from Episodic Online Risk Exposure,” Proceedings on ACM Human-Computer Interaction, 1(CSCW), Article 76. doi: 10.1145/3134711
  11. Pinter, A., Wisniewski, P. , Xu, H., Rosson, M.B., Carroll, J.M. (2017) “Adolescent Online Safety: Moving Beyond Formative Evaluations to Designing Solutions for the Future,” Short paper in the Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Interaction Design and Children (IDC 2017), Stanford, CA.
  12. Poole, E. S., and Peyton, T. (2013) Interaction design research with adolescents: methodological challenges and best practices. In Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children (IDC 2013). New York, NY.
  13. Wisniewski, P., Xu, H., Rosson, M.B., and Carroll, J.M. (2017a) “Parents Just Don’t Understand: Why Teens Don’t Talk to Parents about Their Online Risk Experiences,” In the Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW 2017), Portland, OR.
  14. Wisniewski, P., Ghosh, A.K., Xu, H., Rosson, M.B., and Carroll, J.M. (2017b) “Parental Control vs. Teen Self-Regulation: Is there a middle ground for mobile online safety?” In the Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW 2017), Portland, OR.
  15. Wisniewski, P., Xu, H., Rosson, M.B., Perkins, D.F., and Carroll, J.M. (2016) “Dear Diary: Teens Reflect on Their Weekly Online Risk Experience” In the Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2016), San Jose, CA.
  16. Wisniewski, P., Jia, H., Wang, N., Zheng, S., Xu, H., Rosson, M.B., and Carroll, J.M. (2015a) “Resilience Mitigates the Negative Effects of Adolescent Internet Addiction and Online Risk Exposure,” In the Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2015), Seoul, Korea.
  17. Wisniewski, P., Jia, H., Xu, H., Rosson, M.B., and Carroll, J.M. (2015b) “’Preventative’ vs. ‘Reactive:’ How Parental Mediation Influences Teens’ Social Media Privacy Behaviors,” In the Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW 2015), Vancouver, BC, Canada.
  18. Wisniewski, P., Xu, H., Rosson, M.B., and Carroll, J.M. (2014) “Adolescent Online Safety: The Moral of the Story,” In the Proceedings of the 2014 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW 2014), Baltimore, MD.

Last updated: 16.8.2019