Motivative automotive systems

Lecturer: 
Prof. Alex Meschtscherjakov
Lecturer's institute: 
University of Salzburg
Date: 
30.10.2019 08:00 to 31.10.2019 14:00

Lectures:
Wednesday, 30.10.19: 8-12 SÄ126, 12-14 SÄ105 + homework
Thursday, 31.10.19: 8-14 SÄ126

Credit points:
For obtaining 2 ECTS, successful participation in all activities of this intensive course is required. The course is relevant at least for information processing science doctoral degree program within the ITEE doctoral program. If space is available, any other doctoral students can participate the course as well, but they are recommended to check from their own supervisor the suitability of this course for their doctoral studies.
Registration:
The number of participants for the course is limited. Please register for the course via the below contact person: Markku.Kekkonen@oulu.fi [OASIS research unit].


Bio:
Alexander Meschtscherjakov is Assistant Professor at the Center for Human-Computer Interaction and Computer Science Department of Salzburg University. He is deputy director of the Center for HCI, leading the Car Interaction Lab and member of the senate of Salzburg University. His background is in Computer Sciences. Currently, he is focusing on persuasive interaction technologies, automotive user interfaces, contextual user experience and challenges of automation for HCI. In particular, Alexander is interested in how different kinds of modalities can be blended to help people to change their attitudes and behavior to achieve their goals. His focus within automotive interaction lies in driver persuasion by means of ambient light, driver distraction research, and UX in autonomous vehicles. With the increasing of automation in different contexts (e.g. industry 4.0 or automated driving) Alexander is researching how user experience is affected by automation and how to design interaction for an automated world. Alexander is a distinguished author, has presented his work at various conferences, and given keynotes on automation and driving experience. He is an active member of the HCI community, has organized several workshops, and was actively involved in the organization of different conferences (e.g., AmI 2009, AutomotiveUI 2011, PERSUASIVE 2016).


Synopsis:
This course will have the design of persuasive technologies (PT) as a core element with a focus on interaction design in the automotive context. Students will be introduced to the concept of persuasion and interaction design including several models, theories. they will discuss the design space of automotive user interfaces and presented several examples of PT in this domain. They will learn methods and techniques of interaction design and prototyping. they will learn how to design interactive systems for the purpose of nudging people to change their attitude or behavior. Several examples for the design of persuasive systems will be shown and discussed. In interactive sessions students will design a persuasive technology in form of a low-fidelity prototype for the automotive domain. They will produce a video prototype of their design persuasive system and present this
prototype. They will reflect on their design and discuss it. Finally, they will be required to write a personal reflection on the course and how they will be.


Outline of the course:
Day 1:
Lecture 1: Introduction to Persuasive Technologies, Models and Theories: In this lecture students will be introduced to persuasive technologies (PT) as a core element with a focus on interaction design.
Lecture 2: Contextual Interaction in the Automotive Domain: Students will be introduced to the automotive domain and given several examples for persuasion the automotive context. Students will discuss the design space of automotive user interfaces and several examples of PT in this domain will be shown.
Lecture 3: Interactive Session: Students will be introduced to methods of interaction design including design thinking, rapid prototyping and video prototyping. They will ideate several ideas for a persuasive interface in the automotive domain and conceptualize them.
Home Work:
Students will create storyboards for their persuasive technology artifact and create a video prototype.
Day 2:
Lecture 4: Presentations part 1: Video prototypes will be presented and discussed with regards to their suitability, effectiveness and potential persuasive effect.
Lecture 5: Presentations part 2: Video prototypes will be presented and discussed with regards to their suitability, effectiveness and potential persuasive effect.
Lecture 6: Reflection: Students will reflect on the implications of the design including legal and ethical aspects of persuasive technologies.
 

Assessment:
- Participation during the lectures (1/3)
- Quality of video prototype (1/3)
- Quality of written reflection (1/3)
 

Last updated: 11.9.2019